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FGSS 1940 : A Global History of Love
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1193, HIST 1930, LGBT 1940 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
By posing seemingly simple questions such as what is love and who has the right to love, this introductory-level lecture course surveys how love has been experienced and expressed from the pre-modern period to the present. Through case studies of familial and conjugal love in Africa, Asia, the US, Europe, and South and Latin America, the course will examine the debates about and enactment's of what constitutes the appropriate way to show love and affection in different cultures and historical contexts. Among the themes we will explore are questions of sexuality, marriage, kinship, and gender rights. A final unit will examine these themes through modern technologies such as the Internet, scientific advances in medicine, and a growing awareness that who and how we love is anything but simple or universal.
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FGSS 2010 : Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program focused on understanding the impact of gender and sexuality on the world around us and on the power hierarchies that structure it. This course provides an overview of key concepts, questions, and debates within feminist studies both locally and globally, focusing mainly on the experiences, historical conditions, and concerns of women as they are shaped by gender and sexuality.  We will read a variety of texts--personal narratives, historical documents, and cultural criticism --across a range of disciplines, and will consider how larger structural systems of both privilege and oppression affect individuals' identities, experiences, and options. We will also examine forms of agency and action taken by women in the face of these larger systems.
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FGSS 2010 : Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program focused on understanding the impact of gender and sexuality on the world around us and on the power hierarchies that structure it. This course provides an overview of key concepts, questions, and debates within feminist studies both locally and globally, focusing mainly on the experiences, historical conditions, and concerns of women as they are shaped by gender and sexuality.  We will read a variety of texts--personal narratives, historical documents, and cultural criticism --across a range of disciplines, and will consider how larger structural systems of both privilege and oppression affect individuals' identities, experiences, and options. We will also examine forms of agency and action taken by women in the face of these larger systems.
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FGSS 2267 : Women and Society in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2267, CAPS 2267 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2290 : Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Crosslisted as: COML 2290, LGBT 2290 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the questions, topics, approaches, and theories that characterize the field of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach (literature, history, anthropology, media, law, and science), we will explore categories such as sexual norms, human rights, power, feminism, queerness, gender/sex, censorship/ moral panic, and identity in Euro-American as well as in postcolonial and global terms. Through a variety of films, primary and secondary sources, you will formulate questions and provide answers to the relationship of these categories with organizing structures, including race, ethnicity, religion, family, marriage, reproduction, the economy, and the state. While we investigate how sexual identities in African, South American, and Asian contexts converge with or challenge Euro-American discourses, we will look at the tools LGBT studies offers for understanding power and culture.
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FGSS 2350 : Literature and Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2350, ENGL 2350, LGBT 2350 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
How does literary language depict the experience of physical suffering? Can a poem or a novel palliate pain, illness, even the possibility of death? From darkly comic narratives of black plague to the rise and fall of hysteria to depictions of the AIDS crisis, this course examines literature centered on medical practices from the early modern period through the twentieth century. Why have medical practices changed, and how do writers address their political, social, and ideological implications? Readings will include a broad range of genres, including poetry (Dickinson, Whitman, Keats), fiction (McEwan, Chekhov, Gilman, Kafka, Camus), theater (Kushner), nonfiction prose (Woolf, Freud), and critical theory (Foucault, Scarry, Canguilhem, Sontag).
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FGSS 2351 : Intro to Africa and its Diaspora
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2351 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the study of Africa and its Diasporas, including the Americas and West Indies, as well as Europe.  The course takes a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach to a range of historical, literary, artistic, religious, economic, and political questions crucial to the understanding of the experiences of people of African descent.  Using maps, films, the visual arts, music, important historical and contemporary texts, and short stories, the course will focus on four major themes: 1) migration and the middle passage; 2) slavery and resistance; 3) segregation, colonialism and freedom movements; and 4) the arts and global Black consciousness.
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FGSS 2421 : Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2421, LGBT 2421 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the anthropology of sex, sexuality and gender, this course uses case studies from around the world to explore how the worlds of the sexes become gendered.  In ethnographic, ethnohistorical and contemporary globalizing contexts, we will look at: intersexuality & 'supernumerary' genders; physical & cultural reproduction; sexuality; and sex- & gender-based violence & power. We will use lectures, films, discussion sections and short field-based exercises.
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FGSS 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2468, BSOC 2468, STS 2468 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this "medicalization of life" may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.
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FGSS 2501 : Playing out Difference: History and Identity in Sports Film
Crosslisted as: AMST 2505, PMA 2501, VISST 2502 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2511 : Black Women to 1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 2511, ASRC 2511, HIST 2511 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the social, cultural and communal lives of black women in North America, beginning with the transatlantic slave trade, and ending in 1900. Topics include Northern and Southern enslavement, first freedoms in the North, Southern emancipation, color consciousness, gener-cross racially and issues of class.
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FGSS 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2512, ASRC 2512, HIST 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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FGSS 2515 : Women and the Novel: Key Questions in Modern Fiction
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2515 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores some of the key questions raised in modern fiction by studying novels by women from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, Jane Austen's Emma, Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own and Mrs. Dalloway, Toni Morrison's Sula, and Leslie Marmon Silko's Gardens in the Dunes. These novels treat issues of slavery and race, ethnicity and the environment, love and marriage, sexuality and homosexuality, and history and women's history. Students in the class will work together to develop strong close readings of the works and to explore the contexts in which they were written. These discussions will help us assess the distinctive impact of women writers in modern fiction.
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FGSS 2633 : Sex, Gender, and Identity in Ancient Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2633 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2760 : Desire
Crosslisted as: COML 2760, ENGL 2760, LGBT 2760, PMA 2680 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Language is a skin," the critic Roland Barthes once wrote: "I rub my language against the other. It is as if I had words instead of fingers, or fingers at the tip of my words. My language trembles with desire." Sexual desire has a history, even a literary history, which we will examine through an introductory survey of European dramatic literature from the Ancient Greeks to the present, as well as classic readings in sexual theory, including Plato, Freud, Foucault, and contemporary feminist and queer theory.
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FGSS 2806 : Roman Law: Slavery, Crime, and Gender
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2806 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2841 : Viruses- Humans-Viral Politics (Social History and Cultural Politics of HIV & AIDS)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2021, BSOC 2841, LGBT 2841, STS 2841 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores what has been termed "the modern plague."  It investigates the social history, cultural politics, biological processes, and global impacts of the retrovirus, HIV, and the disease syndrome, AIDS. It engages material from multiple fields: life sciences, social sciences, & humanities as well as media reports, government documents, activist art, and community-based documentaries. It explores various meanings and life-experiences of HIV & AIDS; examines conflicting understandings of health, disease, the body; investigates political struggles over scientific research, biomedical & public health interventions, and cultural representations; and queries how HIV vulnerability is shaped by systems of power and inequality. As well, we come to learn about the practices, the politics, and the ethics of life and care that arise in "the age of epidemic."
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FGSS 3000 : Feminist Theory
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will work across and between the disciplines to consider what it might mean to think 'as a feminist' about many things including, but not limited to 'gender', 'women' and 'sexuality'. We will approach theory as a tool for analyzing relations of power and a means of transforming ways of thinking and living. In particular, we will investigate the cultural, social, and historical assumptions that shape the possibilities and problematics of gender and sexuality. Throughout we will attend to specific histories of class, race, ethnicity, culture, nation, religion and sexuality, with an eye to their particular incitements to and challenges for feminist thinking and politics.
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FGSS 3210 : Gender and the Brain
Crosslisted as: BIONB 3215, LGBT 3210 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
In this course, we will delve into the neuroscience of gender difference. Reading the original scientific papers and related critical texts, we will ask whether we can find measureable physical differences in male and female brains, and what these differences might be. Do men and women solve spatial puzzles differently, as measured physiologically? Do nonhuman animals display sex-specific behaviors mediated by brain structure, and can we extrapolate these findings to human behavior? Why are boys three times more likely than girls to be diagnosed as autistic, and is there any connection between the predominantly male phenomenon of autism and other stereotypically male mental traits? Are there physical representations of sexual orientation in the brain, and how are these related to gender identity? And how are scientific studies represented and misrepresented in popular debate?
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FGSS 3320 : Gender and Psychopathology
Crosslisted as: HD 3320 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course examines the ways in which sex and gender impact the expression of severe psychopathology. We will study biological, psychological, and cultural factors associated with sex and gender as they influence the epidemiology, phenomenology, etiology, diagnosis, and course of illness in major forms of psychopathology: specifically, schizophrenia, major affective illness, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. We will also examine the complicated roles of race, class, sexuality, and gender identity as they relate to these conditions. These topics will be examined through the frameworks of psychological science and feminism in an attempt to understand the effects that gender and science have on one another and the ways in which they influence the understanding of mental illness.
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FGSS 3376 : Digital Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3376, ASIAN 6676, FGSS 6676 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
New media remain central to ongoing struggles over the constitution of the public sphere in Asia. In high measure, censorship affects the Internet and visual media (including digital, independent cinema), and government agencies are particularly wary of the viral qualities of new media. Extensive state investment into Internet control is offset by the fact that the Internet remains a primary site of political dissent and organizing. New media and communications technologies further continue to engender novel forms of political expression and notions of collectivity. In the past few years activists and artists as well as mass publics have thus forged distinct modes of expression in and around new media that, while frequently evading state prohibition, nevertheless present incisive political critique. The course will examine features unique to digital media—such as the viral, mimetic, archival, and amplificatory properties of the Internet—and ask how politicized media make use of these features to intervene into contexts of censorship and occlusion. We will draw on Asian media contexts also to interrogate assumptions about progressive politics. Investigating the logics of contemporary digital media in relation to the field of political expression, the course complicates received notions of non-Western political public spheres as illiberal, or lagging behind a stage of political development posited as normative.
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FGSS 3400 : Refugees and the Politics of Vulnerability: Intersections of Feminist Theory and Practice
Crosslisted as: AMST 3420, GOVT 3401, LSP 3402 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"We're undone by each other. And if we're not, we're missing something," writes Judith Butler in Precarious Life. Can our mutual vulnerability serve as the basis for political intervention and social justice? More specifically, how does a politics of vulnerability help us address the worldwide refugee crisis? How does it limit or preclude an understanding of certain conditions? How might the notion of precarity / precarious lives supplement vulnerability? We will use the growing body of feminist scholarship on vulnerability in law, philosophy, migration studies, and other fields to analyze the refugee crisis in particular locations, including Central American refugees being detained in the U.S. and Syrian refugees fleeing to Europe. We will focus on the intersections of media representation, immigration policy, and activism.
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FGSS 3505 : Blaxploitation Film and Photography
Crosslisted as: AMST 3515, ARTH 3505, ASRC 3505, PMA 3505, VISST 3505 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Blaxploitation films of the 1970s are remembered for their gigantic Afros, enormous guns, slammin' soundtracks, sex, drugs, nudity, and violence. Never before or since have so many African American performers been featured in starring roles. Macho male images were projected alongside strong, yet sexually submissive female ones. But how did these images affect the roles that black men and women played on and off the screen and the portrayal of the black body in contemporary society? This interdisciplinary course explores the range of ideas and methods used by critical thinkers in addressing the body in art, film, photography and the media. We will consider how the display of the black body affects how we see and interpret the world by examining the construction of beauty, fashion, hairstyles and gendered images as well as sexuality, violence, race, and hip-hop culture.
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FGSS 3520 : (Dis)ability Studies: A Brief History
Crosslisted as: FREN 3520 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course will offer an historical overview of responses to bodily and cognitive difference.  What was the status of the monster, the freak, the abnormal, the (dis)abled, and how are all of these concepts related?  How have we moved from isolation and institutionalization towards universal design and accessibility as the dominant concepts relative to (dis)ability?  Why is this shift from focusing on individual difference as a negative attribute to reshaping our architectural and more broadly social constructions important for everyone?  What are our ethical responsibilities towards those we label as "disabled"?  Authors to be studied include: Ambroise Paré, Emmanuel Levinas, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Lennard Davis, Tobin Siebers, Simon Baron-Cohen.
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FGSS 3550 : Decadence
Crosslisted as: COML 3550, ENGL 3550, LGBT 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
"My existence is a scandal," Oscar Wilde once wrote, summing up in an epigram the effect of his carefully cultivated style of perversity and paradox. Through their celebration of "art for art's sake" and all that was considered artificial, unnatural, or obscene, the Decadent writers of the late-nineteenth century sought to free the pleasures of beauty, spirituality, and sexual desire from their more conventional ethical moorings. We will focus on the literature of the period, including works by Charles Baudelaire, Edgar Allan Poe, A. C. Swinburne, and especially Oscar Wilde, and we will also consider related developments in aesthetic philosophy, painting, music, theater, architecture, and design.
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FGSS 3651 : Freud and the Invention of Psychoanalysis
Crosslisted as: COML 3781, FREN 3560, GERST 3561, ROMS 3560, STS 3651 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
FGSS 3990 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Individual study program intended for juniors and seniors working on special topics with selected reading or research projects not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with a FGSS faculty member who has agreed to supervise the independent study.
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FGSS 3991 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Individual study program intended for juniors and seniors working on special topics with selected reading or research projects not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with a FGSS faculty member who has agreed to supervise the independent study.
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FGSS 4000 : Senior Seminar in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
For Spring 2018, this course will focus on The Complexities of Consent.  The issue of consent is central to much feminism scholarship, yet its meaning is contested. It figures prominently in relation to sex as well as to other issues, such as informed consent to medical procedures, children's rights, surrogacy, and (alienated) labor. Consent occurs (or doesn't) within structures of power; can one consent within conditions that are not, so to speak, of one's own making? What about subjects, such as children, who do not use the "rational" language of consent? We draw from legal theory, science studies, and philosophy. How does consent differ from agency? Autonomy? Freedom? We consider case studies that speak to how consent is defined differently across cultures. Under what conditions is consent possible? What alternatives might we envision?
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FGSS 4035 : Intersectionality in Disability Studies
Crosslisted as: ILRLR 4035 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
While this course has a centering focus on the disability experience--in part because of the way in which disability is often left out of intersectional considerations--it will reveal how the economic, legal, and political structures of power and privilege that disadvantage people with disabilities cannot be looked at on a disability-specific basis alone. Thus we will give necessary attention to the disability experience as it overlaps and connects with lived experiences of race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and citizenship, among others. In looking particularly at the realms of employment, education, the law, and health care, we will explore the efficacy of legal and policy initiatives that are already in place, and in doing so, strongly consider the growing need for, and value of, intersectional approaches to discrimination and oppression.
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FGSS 4127 : The Body Politic in Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, ASIAN 6615, CAPS 4127, FGSS 6127, HIST 4127, HIST 6127 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures.  The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.
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FGSS 4145 : Race and Gender in the Middle Ages
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4145, ENGL 6145, MEDVL 4145, MEDVL 6145 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
If "the past is a foreign country," is it a country full of oppressed women? We can, with some smugness, agree that it may have been dreadful to be a woman or sexual minority in the Middle Ages, but it's nowhere near that simple. Also un-simple are medieval notions of race. Scholars long assumed that the European Middle Ages were entirely white and/or that since "race" as a concept hadn't been invented yet, it wasn't an issue. But both racial and gender difference matter tremendously, then as now. Together, we will think about race and gender as imagined at a time before the world we now know came into being, asking what the pre-history of difference might have to do with us and our future.
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FGSS 4290 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4490, ANTHR 7490, FGSS 6290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 4240, RELST 6290 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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FGSS 4402 : Women in Hip Hop
Crosslisted as: AMST 4402, ANTHR 4102, ASRC 4402, LGBT 4402 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4451 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4451, ASIAN 6631, FGSS 6331, LGBT 4451, LGBT 6331, PMA 4451, RELST 4451 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4460 : Women in the Economy
Crosslisted as: ECON 3440, ILRLE 4450 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Examines the changing economic roles of women and men in the labor market and in the family. Topics include a historical overview of changing gender roles, the determinants of the gender division of labor in the family, trends in female and male labor-force participation, gender differences in occupations and earnings, the consequences of women's employment for the family, and a consideration of women's status in other countries.
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FGSS 4504 : The City: Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4423, ASIAN 6623, FGSS 6504, PMA 4504 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course uses the lens of temporality to track transformations in notions of urban personhood and collective life engendered by recent trans-Asia economic shifts. We will develop tools that help unpack the spatial and cultural forms of density and the layered histories that define the contemporary urban fabric of cities such as Hanoi, Bangkok, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. The course combines the investigation of the cinemas and literatures of the region with the study of recent writing on cities from Asian studies, film studies, queer theory, urban studies, political theory, religious studies, cultural geography, literary theory, and anthropology.
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FGSS 4578 : The Bodies That Were Not Ours: Visual and Textual Representations of Brown Bodies
Crosslisted as: AMST 4578, ENGL 4578, LATA 4578, LSP 4578 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores representations of brown bodies across literatures and cultural production. Linking historical contexts like sixteenth-century conquest and colonialism with contemporary wars and policies like NAFTA, we will look at art, watch film, and read texts that explore brown, female, and queer bodies and the contemporary intersections of capitalism, transnational labor, gender, and feminism to ask how bodies are constructed. From Alicia Gaspar de Alba's Desert Blood (2005) and Sylvia Moreno-Garcia's Certain Dark Things (2016) to Coco Fusco's performances on institutional violence against women of color, we investigate fantasy and science fictions and the critical turn toward Afro- and Chicana futurisms that figure brown bodies as conduit, as alien, and as cyborg. Addressing interplays between art and consciousness-raising, we examine different modes of representation concerning Latinas, Chicanas, Indigena, and Afro-Latinas in documentary film, photographic essays, poetry, art, and fiction. We ask how such representations participate or intervene in exploitations and if there are alternatives to representing brown bodies as human.
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FGSS 4601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4601, ARTH 6601, FGSS 6601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
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FGSS 4607 : Written on the Body
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4446, COML 4704 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Images of tattooed, inscribed, and marked bodies abound in popular media, from television series to blogs, from performance art to popular literature. When the body becomes a canvas or text, this raises crucial questions about the interactions between individual bodies, culture/s, and society/ies. In this course we will pay particular attention to the shifting meanings of body modification in different cultural, theoretical, and historical contexts. Course material will include texts, films, and artwork by Michel de Certeau, Jacques Derrida, Georges Didi-Huberman, Lalla Essaydi, Zhang Huan, Franz Kafka, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Mirta Kupferminc, Christopher Nolan, Renata Salecl, Stelarc, Jun'ichiro Tanizaki, Qiu Zhijie, and others, as well as television series, internet forums, and other popular culture formats.
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FGSS 4755 : Sexology and the Novel
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4755, LGBT 4755 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4841 : What is (an) Epidemic? (Infectious Diseases in Historical, Social, and Political Perspective)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4041, BSOC 4841, STS 4841 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The term "epidemic" travels widely and wildly in contemporary worlds.  But, what, when and where is "the epidemic"? How and why does epidemic unfold? This senior seminar offers an interdisciplinary exploration of infectious diseases.  Our investigations take us from medieval Europe's "Black Plague," to Tuberculosis in early twentieth century United States and its global resurgence at the turn of the twenty-first, to Ebola and its ongoing, periodic outbreaks today. We consider the consequences epidemics have for how we live and imagine shared ecological futures.  Examining work from the life sciences, social sciences, and arts & humanities, we explore the ways in which life and death, disease and survivability, health and thriving are shaped by infectious microbes, embodied eco-social forces, and contingent regimes of knowledge-power. 
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FGSS 4876 : Humanitarian Affects
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4176, ANTHR 7176, FGSS 6876, GOVT 4745, GOVT 6745 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4947 : Bio-Politics and Poetics of Nakedness
Crosslisted as: COML 4947 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4950 : Gender, Power, and Authority in England, 1600 to 1800
Crosslisted as: HIST 4950, HIST 6905 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
It is a truism that early modern society was a 'patriarchal' one in which men had authority -- but how did that authority operate and what were its limits? How did the exercise of power between men and women intersect with religious, literary, legal and political institutions? We will approach these questions chronologically, examining the impact of the Reformation, the English Revolution, the Enlightenment, the rise of middle class and polite culture. We will also explore them methodologically and generically, with an eye to how different kinds of evidence and sources can produce different kinds of conclusions. Historians' hypotheses will be tested by analysis of primary sources.
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FGSS 4990 : Senior Honors Thesis I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, FGSS majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an FGSS faculty member and defend that thesis orally before an honors committee. To be eligible for honors, students must have at least a cumulative GPA of 3.3 in all course work and a 3.5 average in all courses applying to their FGSS major. Students interested in the honors program should consult the DUS late in the spring semester of their junior year or very early in the fall semester of their senior year.
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FGSS 4991 : Senior Honors Thesis II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, FGSS majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an FGSS faculty member and defend that thesis orally before an honors committee. To be eligible for honors, students must have at least a cumulative GPA of 3.3 in all course work and a 3.5 average in all courses applying to their FGSS major. Students interested in the honors program should consult the DUS late in the spring semester of their junior year or very early in the fall semester of their senior year.
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FGSS 6000 : Special Topics in Feminist Theory
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
FGSS 6127 : The Body Politic in Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, ASIAN 6615, CAPS 4127, FGSS 4127, HIST 4127, HIST 6127 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures.  The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.
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FGSS 6207 : Black Feminist Theories: Sexuality, Creativity, and Power
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6207, COML 6465, ENGL 6207 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course examines black feminist theories as they are articulated in the cross-cultural experiences of women across the African Diaspora. We will explore a variety of theories, texts and creative encounters within their socio-political and geographical frames and locations, analyzing these against, or in relation to, a range of feminist activisms and movements. Some key categories of discussion will include Black Left Feminism, Feminist Movements in Latin America and the Caribbean and African feminisms. Texts like the Combahee River Collective statement and a variety of US Black feminist positions and the related literature as well as earlier black feminist articulations such as the Sojourners for Truth and Justice will also be engaged. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own research projects from a range of possibilities.
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FGSS 6290 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4490, ANTHR 7490, FGSS 4290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 4240, RELST 6290 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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FGSS 6331 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4451, ASIAN 6631, FGSS 4451, LGBT 4451, LGBT 6331, PMA 4451, RELST 4451 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Examines the new cinemas of Southeast Asia and their engagement with contemporary discourses of gender and sexuality. It pays special attention to the ways in which sexuality and gendered embodiment are at present linked to citizenship and other forms of belonging and to how the films draw on Buddhist and Islamic traditions of representation and belief. Focusing on globally circulating Southeast Asian films of the past 15 years, the course draws on current writings from feminism, Buddhist studies, affect theory, queer studies, postcolonial theory, and film studies to ask what new understandings of subjectivity might emerge from these cinemas and their political contexts. Films will be drawn from both mainstream and independent cinema and will include the work of directors such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Danny and Oxide Pang, Yau Ching, Thunska Pansittivorakul, Garin Nugroho, and Jean-Jacques Annaud.
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FGSS 6504 : The City: Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4423, ASIAN 6623, FGSS 4504, PMA 4504 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course uses the lens of temporality to track transformations in notions of urban personhood and collective life engendered by recent trans-Asia economic shifts. We will develop tools that help unpack the spatial and cultural forms of density and the layered histories that define the contemporary urban fabric of cities such as Hanoi, Bangkok, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. The course combines the investigation of the cinemas and literatures of the region with the study of recent writing on cities from Asian studies, film studies, queer theory, urban studies, political theory, religious studies, cultural geography, literary theory, and anthropology.
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FGSS 6554 : Modernist Fiction and the Erotics of Style
Crosslisted as: ENGL 6554, LGBT 6445 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"I am interested in language because it wounds or seduces me," the critic Roland Barthes once wrote. How do we take pleasure in a text, even when it appears to betray us? How do we speak of the erotics of style beyond the mere thematic interpretation of sexual representation? Has such an erotics even been written yet? To explore a methodology for contemplating this elusive embrace between the aesthetic and the erotic, we will consider influential works of psychoanalytic, deconstructive, feminist, and queer theory alongside a survey of great modernist novelists whose innovative experiments in prose style have proved most sensual and most challenging, among them Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Ronald Firbank, and Djuna Barnes.
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FGSS 6601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4601, ARTH 6601, FGSS 4601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
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FGSS 6676 : Digital Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3376, ASIAN 6676, FGSS 3376 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
New media remain central to ongoing struggles over the constitution of the public sphere in Asia. In high measure, censorship affects the Internet and visual media (including digital, independent cinema), and government agencies are particularly wary of the viral qualities of new media. Extensive state investment into Internet control is offset by the fact that the Internet remains a primary site of political dissent and organizing. New media and communications technologies further continue to engender novel forms of political expression and notions of collectivity. In the past few years activists and artists as well as mass publics have thus forged distinct modes of expression in and around new media that, while frequently evading state prohibition, nevertheless present incisive political critique. The course will examine features unique to digital media—such as the viral, mimetic, archival, and amplificatory properties of the Internet—and ask how politicized media make use of these features to intervene into contexts of censorship and occlusion. We will draw on Asian media contexts also to interrogate assumptions about progressive politics. Investigating the logics of contemporary digital media in relation to the field of political expression, the course complicates received notions of non-Western political public spheres as illiberal, or lagging behind a stage of political development posited as normative.
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FGSS 6876 : Humanitarian Affects
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4176, ANTHR 7176, FGSS 4876, GOVT 4745, GOVT 6745 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 6990 : Topics in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent reading course for graduate students on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students develop a course of readings in consultation with a faculty member in the field of Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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FGSS 6990 : Topics in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course for graduate students on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students develop a course of readings in consultation with a faculty member in the field of Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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FGSS 7312 : Vocality and Embodiment
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 7312, PMA 7312 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The voice occupies a peculiar phenomenological position, on one hand emanating from material bodies and conveying that materiality with register, mannerism, grain, and break; on the other hand existing as disembodied sound waves, and an internalized sonorous Other. This course will explore the many cultural and conceptual approaches to the voice and its role in the production of music, language, desire, subjectivity, embodiment, and the human.  Students will workshop projects developed within the course or already underway as part of a dissertation, article, performance, or recording.
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