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FGSS 2010 : Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Julia Chang
Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program focused on understanding the impact of gender and sexuality on the world around us and on the power hierarchies that structure it. This course provides an overview of key concepts, questions, and debates within feminist studies both locally and globally, focusing mainly on the experiences, historical conditions, and concerns of women as they are shaped by gender and sexuality.  We will read a variety of texts--personal narratives, historical documents, and cultural criticism --across a range of disciplines, and will consider how larger structural systems of both privilege and oppression affect individuals' identities, experiences, and options. We will also examine forms of agency and action taken by women in the face of these larger systems.
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FGSS 2010 : Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jane Juffer
Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program focused on understanding the impact of gender and sexuality on the world around us and on the power hierarchies that structure it. This course provides an overview of key concepts, questions, and debates within feminist studies both locally and globally, focusing mainly on the experiences, historical conditions, and concerns of women as they are shaped by gender and sexuality.  We will read a variety of texts--personal narratives, historical documents, and cultural criticism --across a range of disciplines, and will consider how larger structural systems of both privilege and oppression affect individuals' identities, experiences, and options. We will also examine forms of agency and action taken by women in the face of these larger systems.
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FGSS 2082 : Of Ice and Men: Masculinities in the Medieval North
Crosslisted as: HIST 2082, MEDVL 2082 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Oren Falk
The Middle Ages are usually imagined as a time of manly men and feminine women: no room for gender ambiguity in Conan the Barbarian! Yet gender, then as now, was in fact unstable, multiple, and above all, constructed. This course explores the different ways masculinity was understood, manufactured, and manipulated in northern Europe – primarily early Ireland, England, and Scandinavia – using a variety of literary, legal, historical, archaeological, and artistic sources. Students will gain new perspectives on both gender and sex, on the one hand, and the history of medieval Europe, on the other.
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FGSS 2267 : Women and Society in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2267, CAPS 2267 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Suyoung Son
This course offers a broad understanding of the active and dynamic cultural, economic, and social, and political roles played by Chinese women. By challenging the dominant stereotype of the passive and victimized Chinese woman, this course aims to examine women's struggles, negotiations, and challenges of the normative discourse of femininity and domesticity in terms of various disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, and literature. Through a combination of reading original texts with secondary scholarship, this course will discuss the issues of Confucianism and patriarchal family, the female body and sexuality, education and self-expression, women's work and religious activities, gender and the state, the modernization of women, etc.
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FGSS 2290 : Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Crosslisted as: COML 2290, LGBT 2290 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Naminata Diabate
This course offers an introduction to the questions, topics, approaches, and theories that characterize the field of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach (literature, history, anthropology, media, law, and science), we will explore categories such as sexual norms, human rights, power, feminism, queerness, gender/sex, censorship/ moral panic, and identity in Euro-American as well as in postcolonial and global terms. Through a variety of films, primary and secondary sources, you will formulate questions and provide answers to the relationship of these categories with organizing structures, including race, ethnicity, religion, family, marriage, reproduction, the economy, and the state. While we investigate how sexual identities in African, South American, and Asian contexts converge with or challenge Euro-American discourses, we will look at the tools LGBT studies offers for understanding power and culture.
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FGSS 2350 : Literature and Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2350, ENGL 2350, LGBT 2350 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Elisha Cohn
How does literary language depict the experience of physical suffering? Can a poem or a novel palliate pain, illness, even the possibility of death? From darkly comic narratives of black plague to the rise and fall of hysteria to depictions of the AIDS crisis, this course examines literature centered on medical practices from the early modern period through the twentieth century. Why have medical practices changed, and how do writers address their political, social, and ideological implications? Readings will include a broad range of genres, including poetry (Dickinson, Whitman, Keats), fiction (McEwan, Chekhov, Gilman, Kafka, Camus), theater (Kushner), nonfiction prose (Woolf, Freud), and critical theory (Foucault, Scarry, Canguilhem, Sontag).
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FGSS 2421 : Worlding Sex and Gender
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2421, LGBT 2421 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Lucinda Ramberg
An introduction to the anthropology of sex, sexuality and gender, this course uses case studies from around the world to explore how the worlds of the sexes become gendered.  In ethnographic, ethnohistorical and contemporary globalizing contexts, we will look at: intersexuality & 'supernumerary' genders; physical & cultural reproduction; sexuality; and sex- & gender-based violence & power. We will use lectures, films, discussion sections and short field-based exercises.
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FGSS 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2468, BSOC 2468, STS 2468 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Saida Hodzic
Elif Sari
Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this "medicalization of life" may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.
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FGSS 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2512, ASRC 2512, HIST 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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FGSS 2577 : American Jewish Women and the Body of Tradition
Crosslisted as: AMST 2577, ANTHR 2577, JWST 2577, NES 2577, RELST 2577 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Cara Rock-Singer
Description
FGSS 2633 : Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2633 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ella Haselswerdt
How did the ancient Greeks and Romans understand differences in gender and sexuality? And how did their gendered identities intersect with other identity categories, like race, class, and citizenship status? In this introductory course we will explore these questions using a wide-ranging selection of philosophy, literature, medical writing, legal texts, magic spells, and material evidence. We will also ask how ancient ideas about sex and gender have influenced our own construction of these categories, and investigate the consequences of modern identification with antiquity. No prior knowledge about the ancient world is required, and all readings will be in English.
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FGSS 2701 : Forbidden Sex: Arabian Nights
Crosslisted as: COML 2700, ENGL 2917, NES 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Parisa Vaziri
This course explores the millenia-long history of remediation of this ancient Perso-Arabic text, with specific attention to the transmission of phobic tropes about miscegenation. We will track the history of the Nights' translation and dissemination throughout the Middle East and Europe, attending to its adaptations in various media.
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FGSS 2760 : Desire
Crosslisted as: COML 2760, ENGL 2760, LGBT 2760, PMA 2680 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ellis Hanson
"Language is a skin," the critic Roland Barthes once wrote: "I rub my language against the other. It is as if I had words instead of fingers, or fingers at the tip of my words. My language trembles with desire." Sexual desire has a history, even a literary history, which we will examine through an introductory survey of European dramatic literature from the Ancient Greeks to the present, as well as classic readings in sexual theory, including Plato, Freud, Foucault, and contemporary feminist and queer theory.
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FGSS 2770 : Islam and Gender
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2470, MEDVL 2770, NES 2770, RELST 2770 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Seema Golestaneh
This course explores the role of gender and sexuality in shaping the lives of Muslims past and present. Through a close examination of ethnographies, intellectual histories, and religious treatises, we will analyze the key debates and discourses surrounding the intersection of gender and Islam. We begin by investigating Quranic revelations and hadith concerning gender and sexual ethics, female figures of emulation in early Islam, and feminist exegeses of the Quran. Continuing onward, we focus upon the everyday lives of Muslim women and non-binary individuals in medieval, colonial, and post-colonial contexts, highlighting the ways in which people negotiate and respond to the sexual politics of the times in which they live as we ask what, if anything, is specifically "Islamic" about the situations under discussion? Following this, we embark upon a history of sexuality within Islam, tracing the ways in which the categories of "homosexuality" and "heterosexuality" came to exist in the Muslim world, as well as the history and positionality of trans communities past and present. We then continue with an exploration of Islamic feminism as it exists today, looking to the ways in which Muslim feminists have critically engaged both religious texts as well as Western feminist theory. Finally, the course concludes by analyzing the relationship between the study of Islam, gender, and empire.
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FGSS 2780 : Body as Text: Pleasure and Danger
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2781, ENGL 2780, LGBT 2780 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Masha Raskolnikov
We experience our bodies as so much a part of who we are that we take them for granted. Yet the way we think about the body has a history of its own. This class looks at how the idea of "the body" gets constructed over time. How has the body come to have attributes called "gender," "sexuality," and "race"? Why have some bodies been seen as monstrous, perverted, and unholy, others as gorgeous, normal, and divine? What makes bodies pleasurable and dangerous? We'll find out by examining a broad range of evidence from the ancient era to the present day, including literature (Ovid, Kafka, Octavia Butler), philosophy (Plato, Descartes, Judith Butler), film, and the history of science.
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FGSS 2806 : Roman Law: Slavery, Crime, and Gender
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2806 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nicole Giannella
This course investigates the rich body of Roman laws on slaves, crime, and women and children. Students will explore the evolution of power over marginalized groups and penalties for crimes at the beginnings of the Western legal system in order to consider ideas of identity, agency, responsibility, and punishment from a cultural and historical perspective. Through an examination of the legal sources (in translation) and the study of the rise and changes of governmental institutions of justice, this course will examine the evolution of jurisprudence: the development of conceptions of power and shifts in the understanding of just punishment. The course is designed as an introduction to these topics suitable for all students.
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FGSS 2841 : Viruses- Humans-Viral Politics (Social History and Cultural Politics of HIV & AIDS)
Crosslisted as: AMST 2841, ANTHR 2021, BSOC 2841, LGBT 2841, STS 2841 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Christopher Roebuck
This course explores what has been termed "the modern plague."  It investigates the social history, cultural politics, biological processes, and global impacts of the retrovirus, HIV, and the disease syndrome, AIDS. It engages material from multiple fields: life sciences, social sciences, & humanities as well as media reports, government documents, activist art, and community-based documentaries. It explores various meanings and life-experiences of HIV & AIDS; examines conflicting understandings of health, disease, the body; investigates political struggles over scientific research, biomedical & public health interventions, and cultural representations; and queries how HIV vulnerability is shaped by systems of power and inequality. As well, we come to learn about the practices, the politics, and the ethics of life and care that arise in "the age of epidemic."
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FGSS 3000 : Feminist Theory
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Durba Ghosh
This course will work across and between the disciplines to consider what it might mean to think 'as a feminist' about many things including, but not limited to 'gender', 'women' and 'sexuality'. We will approach theory as a tool for analyzing relations of power and a means of transforming ways of thinking and living. In particular, we will investigate the cultural, social, and historical assumptions that shape the possibilities and problematics of gender and sexuality. Throughout we will attend to specific histories of class, race, ethnicity, culture, nation, religion and sexuality, with an eye to their particular incitements to and challenges for feminist thinking and politics.
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FGSS 3206 : Black Women and Political Leadership
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3206, ENGL 3606 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
This course studies the life experiences and political struggles of black women who have attained political leadership. It will study their rise to political power through an examination of the autobiographies of women from the Caribbean, the U.S., Africa and Brazil. Political figures such as Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Shirley Chisholm, Benedita da Silva will serve as some of the primary sources of analysis and discussion. Students will have the opportunity to select and follow a political leader and her challenges closely. The first half of the course will examine some of the general literature on the subject; the second half will study the women in their own words. We will attempt to have some available local political leaders visit the class.
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FGSS 3210 : Gender and the Brain
Crosslisted as: BIONB 3215, LGBT 3210 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Shelby Dietz
Why are boys more likely than girls to be diagnosed with autism, and why are women more likely than men to be diagnosed with depression? Are there different "gay" and "straight" brains? And how does brain science interact with gender and sexuality in popular debate? Reading and discussing the original scientific papers and related critical texts, we will delve into the neuroscience of gender.
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FGSS 3310 : Afro-Asia: Futurism and Feminisms
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3310, COML 3310 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Tao Goffe
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FGSS 3320 : Gender and Psychopathology
Crosslisted as: HD 3320 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lauren Korfine
This course examines the ways in which sex and gender impact the expression of severe psychopathology. We will study biological, psychological, and cultural factors associated with sex and gender as they influence the epidemiology, phenomenology, etiology, diagnosis, and course of illness in major forms of psychopathology: specifically, schizophrenia, major affective illness, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. We will also examine the complicated roles of race, class, sexuality, and gender identity as they relate to these conditions. These topics will be examined through the frameworks of psychological science and feminism in an attempt to understand the effects that gender and science have on one another and the ways in which they influence the understanding of mental illness.
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FGSS 3376 : Digital Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3376, ASIAN 6676, FGSS 6676 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Arnika Fuhrmann
New media remain central to ongoing struggles over the constitution of the public sphere in Asia. In high measure, censorship affects the Internet and visual media (including digital, independent cinema), and government agencies are particularly wary of the viral qualities of new media. Extensive state investment into Internet control is offset by the fact that the Internet remains a primary site of political dissent and organizing. New media and communications technologies further continue to engender novel forms of political expression and notions of collectivity. In the past few years activists and artists as well as mass publics have thus forged distinct modes of expression in and around new media that, while frequently evading state prohibition, nevertheless present incisive political critique. The course will examine features unique to digital media—such as the viral, mimetic, archival, and amplificatory properties of the Internet—and ask how politicized media make use of these features to intervene into contexts of censorship and occlusion. We will draw on Asian media contexts also to interrogate assumptions about progressive politics. Investigating the logics of contemporary digital media in relation to the field of political expression, the course complicates received notions of non-Western political public spheres as illiberal, or lagging behind a stage of political development posited as normative.
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FGSS 3400 : Refugees and the Politics of Vulnerability: Intersections of Feminist Theory and Practice
Crosslisted as: AMST 3420, GOVT 3401, LSP 3402 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jane Juffer
Topic Spring 2019: Child Refugees and Politics: Children comprised 52 percent of the worldwide refugee population of 68.5 million in 2017. Traveling with families as well as unaccompanied, they appear in media accounts as the most vulnerable and at risk of all refugees. In this course, we will consider to what degree this assignation of vulnerability, often corresponding with victimhood, shapes the journeys and lives of refugee children. We will use the growing body of feminist scholarship on vulnerability in law, philosophy, migration studies, and other fields to investigate how "vulnerability" creates categories of worthy and unworthy victims. In the U.S., for example, images of babies and toddlers being separated from Central American parents prompted outrage. Yet images of teenage boys in makeshift tents in the New Mexico desert went largely uncovered. At what age does a child no longer deserve sympathy and protection? In what ways does vulnerability overshadow children's agency? How might vulnerability be rearticulated so as to address children's specific needs, at different ages? Our main focus will be Central American and Mexican children crossing into the U.S. at the southern border, but we will make comparisons to other groups throughout the world.
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FGSS 3520 : (Dis)ability Studies: A Brief History
Crosslisted as: FREN 3520 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kathleen Long
This course will offer an historical overview of responses to bodily and cognitive difference.  What was the status of the monster, the freak, the abnormal, the (dis)abled, and how are all of these concepts related?  How have we moved from isolation and institutionalization towards universal design and accessibility as the dominant concepts relative to (dis)ability?  Why is this shift from focusing on individual difference as a negative attribute to reshaping our architectural and more broadly social constructions important for everyone?  What are our ethical responsibilities towards those we label as "disabled"?  Authors to be studied include: Ambroise Paré, Emmanuel Levinas, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Lennard Davis, Tobin Siebers, Simon Baron-Cohen.
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FGSS 3540 : Modeling Race, Fashioning Beauty
Crosslisted as: AMST 3560, ASRC 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Noliwe Rooks
This course explores written and visual biographies of African American and African women in the fashion industry as a launching point for thinking about beauty, race, gender and class. Some of the questions that will be explored during the semester are: How do ethnicity and femininity intersect? How are authenticity and difference commodified? How do women construct identities through narrative or craft themselves through body modification? How do women negotiate their relationships to their bodies, families and nations? Contemporary television programs, global fashion and cultural studies will also be discussed. Students will write self-narratives about their relationships with cultural standards of beauty.
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FGSS 3651 : Freud and the Invention of Psychoanalysis
Crosslisted as: COML 3781, FREN 3560, GERST 3561, ROMS 3560, STS 3651 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Tracy McNulty
Psychoanalysis considers the human being not as an object of treatment, but as a subject who is called upon to elaborate an unconscious knowledge about what is disrupting her life, through analysis of dreams, symptoms, bungled actions, slips of the tongue, and repetitive behaviors.  Freud finds that these apparently irrational acts and behavior are ordered by the logic of the fantasy, which provides a mental representation of a traumatic childhood experience and the effects it unleashes in the mind and body-effects he called drives.  As "unbound" energies, the drives give rise to symptoms, repetitive acts, and fantasmatic stagings that menace our health and sometimes threaten social coexistence, but that also rise to the desires, creative acts, and social projects we identify as the essence of human life.  Readings will include fundamental texts on the unconscious, repression, fantasy, and the death drive, as well as case studies and speculative essays on mythology, art, religion, and group psychology.  Students will be asked to keep a dream journal and to work on their unconscious formations, and will have the chance to produce creative projects as well as analytic essays.
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FGSS 3754 : Spoken Word, Hip-Hop Theater, and the Politics of the Performance
Crosslisted as: AMST 3754, ENGL 3954, LGBT 3754, LSP 3754, PMA 3754 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Karen Jaime
In this course, we will critically examine the production and performance of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender through literature and contemporary performance genres such as spoken word, slam poetry, and hip-hop theatre.
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FGSS 3990 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Durba Ghosh
Lucinda Ramberg
Jane Juffer
Saida Hodzic
Individual study program intended for juniors and seniors working on special topics with selected reading or research projects not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with a FGSS faculty member who has agreed to supervise the independent study.
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FGSS 3991 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jane Juffer
Saida Hodzic
Lucinda Ramberg
Kate McCullough
Debra Castillo
Durba Ghosh
Individual study program intended for juniors and seniors working on special topics with selected reading or research projects not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with a FGSS faculty member who has agreed to supervise the independent study.
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FGSS 4000 : Senior Seminar in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Saida Hodzic
This course is a capstone seminar for FGSS majors and minors. It serves as an opportunity to synthesize various strands of feminist analysis and feminist theory gained during your undergraduate education and to extend them in new directions. We will ask: what do feminist theories and concepts mean for your research interests, your activist practices, and your life and career? How can feminist analytical perspectives inform your current and future pursuits? We will make feminist theoretical frameworks and analytical moves transparent and formally explicit, highlight intersectional, queer, transnational, and postcolonial perspectives; b) sharpen your feminist analytics through independent research; and c) integrate it into your research project, culminating in a capstone paper. In Spring 2019, we will explore these questions through the theme of displacement and belonging. We will read texts on refugees and refuge, on queer belonging, and on loss and connection in the aftermath of slavery. 
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FGSS 4035 : Intersectionality in Disability Studies
Crosslisted as: ILRLR 4035 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
LaWanda Cook
Allison Heinemann
A recognition of the importance of intersectionality has become increasingly key to not only understand the complexity of social identity and lived experience, but to combat discrimination and oppression. While the course has a centering focus on the disability experience-in part because of the way in which disability is often left out of intersectional considerations-it will reveal how the economic, legal, and political structures of power and privilege that disadvantage people with disabilities cannot be looked at on a disability-specific basis alone. Thus we will give necessary attention to the disability experience as it overlaps and connects with lived experiences of race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and citizenship, among others. In looking particularly at the realms of employment, education, the law, and health care, we will explore the efficacy of legal and policy initiatives that are already in place, and in doing so, strongly consider the growing need for, and value of, intersectional approaches to discrimination and oppression.                                                       
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FGSS 4145 : Race and Gender in the Middle Ages
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4145, ENGL 6145, MEDVL 4145, MEDVL 6145 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Masha Raskolnikov
If "the past is a foreign country," is it a country full of oppressed women? We can, with some smugness, agree that it may have been dreadful to be a woman or sexual minority in the Middle Ages, but it's nowhere near that simple. Also un-simple are medieval notions of race. Scholars long assumed that the European Middle Ages were entirely white and/or that since "race" as a concept hadn't been invented yet, it wasn't an issue. But both racial and gender difference matter tremendously, then as now. Together, we will think about race and gender as imagined at a time before the world we now know came into being, asking what the pre-history of difference might have to do with us and our future.
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FGSS 4261 : Topics in 20th C. Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4261, PHIL 6260, ROMS 4261, ROMS 6261 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
M. Kosch
Topic in 20th Century Philosophy.
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FGSS 4292 : Sexual Identities and the Media
Crosslisted as: COMM 4292 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Katherine Sender
What spaces are available for imagining non-normative sexualities and non-binary genders in mainstream and alternative media? This class moves beyond a simple consideration of how lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transgender and queer people have been represented in the mainstream media to consider how media offer LGBTQ people alternative platforms for queer world-making. Further, this course is an exploration in our own queer world-making. Each assignment asks you to create a visual work that engages with materials from the class and from popular and queer media. This course is not about making "good" or "pretty" art, but about using creative processes to think differently—queerly—about LGBTQ representations. This class guides an adventure in looking differently at the world, including the media world, through the practice of queer making.
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FGSS 4312 : Synthesizing Pop: Electronics and the Musical Imagination
Crosslisted as: FGSS 6312, LGBT 4312, LGBT 6312, MUSIC 4312, MUSIC 6312, STS 4312, STS 6312 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Roger Moseley
Judith Peraino
From Switched-On Bach to Synthpop and EDM, since the late 1960s electronic synthesizers have expanded the sonic palette and identity formation of popular musicians, leading to new concepts of sound and performance as well as communal, technological, and human interfaces. This course will explore the cultural history of analog synthesizers and their progeny of digital devices (samplers, sequencers, drum machines) and desktop technologies that revolutionized popular music soundscapes and embodiment. Synthesis will be considered as both a musical technology and theoretical concept that together spark imagined cyborg identities and post-human futures, challenging and resynthesizing categories of gender, sexuality, and race. Student will also have the opportunity to engage with Cornell's Robert Moog Archive and develop research, creative, or curation projects that may be featured in the spring 2020 exhibition and programming to celebrate this collection.  This course is open to graduate students and fourth-year undergraduates by permission.  Undergraduates should contact the instructor before enrolling.
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FGSS 4331 : Women, Real and Imagined: British Romanticism
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4330 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Cynthia Chase
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FGSS 4371 : Sociology of Sex and Gender
Crosslisted as: SOC 4370 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Vida Maralani
This course provides an introduction to the theoretical and empirical literature on the sociology of sex and gender. The readings cover theory and methods, feminism, masculinity, intersectionality, international/comparative perspectives, gender roles, and recent sociological research in this area.
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FGSS 4451 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4451, ASIAN 6631, FGSS 6331, LGBT 4451, LGBT 6331, PMA 4451, RELST 4451 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Arnika Fuhrmann
Examines the new cinemas of Southeast Asia and their engagement with contemporary discourses of gender and sexuality. It pays special attention to the ways in which sexuality and gendered embodiment are at present linked to citizenship and other forms of belonging and to how the films draw on Buddhist and Islamic traditions of representation and belief. Focusing on globally circulating Southeast Asian films of the past 15 years, the course draws on current writings from feminism, Buddhist studies, affect theory, queer studies, postcolonial theory, and film studies to ask what new understandings of subjectivity might emerge from these cinemas and their political contexts. Films will be drawn from both mainstream and independent cinema and will include the work of directors such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Danny and Oxide Pang, Yau Ching, Thunska Pansittivorakul, Garin Nugroho, and Jean-Jacques Annaud.
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FGSS 4504 : The City: Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4423, ASIAN 6623, FGSS 6504, PMA 4504 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Arnika Fuhrmann
This course uses the lens of temporality to track transformations in notions of urban personhood and collective life engendered by recent trans-Asia economic shifts. We will develop tools that help unpack the spatial and cultural forms of density and the layered histories that define the contemporary urban fabric of cities such as Hanoi, Bangkok, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. The course combines the investigation of the cinemas and literatures of the region with the study of recent writing on cities from Asian studies, film studies, queer theory, urban studies, political theory, religious studies, cultural geography, literary theory, and anthropology.
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FGSS 4509 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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FGSS 4601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4601, ARTH 6601, FGSS 6601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lisa Pincus
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
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FGSS 4641 : Racial Ecologies of Transpacific Nuclearism
Crosslisted as: AAS 4640, AMST 4640, COML 4640, FGSS 6641, SHUM 4640, SHUM 6640 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
This course examines the emergence of nuclear energy in Asia and the Pacific after World War Two as a transpacific settler colonial institution and discourse. Building on current environmental humanities scholarship on the nuclear Pacific, this course uses transpacific nuclearism as an anchoring point to explore ways that theories of biopolitics, necropolitics, and comparative racialization can productively inform scholarly approaches to contemporary ecological crises. For longer description and instructor bio visit http://societyhumanities.as.cornell.edu/courses.
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FGSS 4645 : Culinary Literature, Literary Food
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4645 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kate McCullough
Description
FGSS 4841 : What is (an) Epidemic? (Infectious Diseases in Historical, Social, and Political Perspective)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4041, BSOC 4841, STS 4841 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christopher Roebuck
The term "epidemic" travels widely and wildly in contemporary worlds.  But, what, when and where is "the epidemic"? How and why does epidemic unfold? This senior seminar offers an interdisciplinary exploration of infectious diseases.  Our investigations take us from medieval Europe's "Black Plague," to Tuberculosis in early twentieth century United States and its global resurgence at the turn of the twenty-first, to Ebola and its ongoing, periodic outbreaks today. We consider the consequences epidemics have for how we live and imagine shared ecological futures.  Examining work from the life sciences, social sciences, and arts & humanities, we explore the ways in which life and death, disease and survivability, health and thriving are shaped by infectious microbes, embodied eco-social forces, and contingent regimes of knowledge-power. 
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FGSS 4845 : Labor, Race, and Gender
Crosslisted as: FGSS 6845, ILRLR 4845, ILRLR 6845 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kate Bronfenbrenner
The majority of existing union members are women and workers of color, and, since the mid-1980s, the majority of newly organized workers have been women of color, particularly black women and recent immigrants from Latin America. Yet, with the exception of just a handful of unions, the labor movement still has been slow to build on this support and enthusiasm. This course will focus on the challenges and possibilities created by the changing demographics of race and gender in the contemporary labor movement. Through a combination of readings, small group discussions, guest speakers, and library and on line research, short essays and one longer research paper; the course will examine these issues from an historical, demographic, labor relations, and sociological perspective.
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FGSS 4944 : Biopolitics: New Directions
Crosslisted as: AMST 4944, COML 4944, COML 6944, GOVT 6946, ROMS 4944, ROMS 6944 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Naminata Diabate
Description
FGSS 4948 : Pleasure and Neoliberalism
Crosslisted as: COML 4948, ROMS 4948 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Naminata Diabate
The comparative seminar explores pleasure and its relationship with neoliberalism. We will follow adopt an interdisciplinary approach and a historical trajectory, starting with the Ancient world though to the contemporary. Our investigation of philosophical reflections on pleasure and neoliberalism will engage important concepts such as the market, subjectivity, pornography, culture, movie viewing, gender and queerness. We will rethink and theorize how new/old media, literary, and other artistic productions facilitate the expression, the search for, and the achievement of pleasure. Through public speaking (class discussions, student presentation) and deep attention to writing (weekly reaction papers, and a final paper), the students will refine their theoretical, conceptual, and artistic accounts of pleasure and neoliberalism and their mutual imbrication.
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FGSS 4950 : Gender, Power, and Authority in England, 1600 to 1800
Crosslisted as: HIST 4950, HIST 6905 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Rachel Weil
It is a truism that early modern society was a 'patriarchal' one in which men had authority -- but how did that authority operate and what were its limits? How did the exercise of power between men and women intersect with religious, literary, legal and political institutions? We will approach these questions chronologically, examining the impact of the Reformation, the English Revolution, the Enlightenment, the rise of middle class and polite culture. We will also explore them methodologically and generically, with an eye to how different kinds of evidence and sources can produce different kinds of conclusions. Historians' hypotheses will be tested by analysis of primary sources.
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FGSS 4990 : Senior Honors Thesis I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Durba Ghosh
Jane Juffer
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
To graduate with honors, FGSS majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an FGSS faculty member and defend that thesis orally before an honors committee. To be eligible for honors, students must have at least a cumulative GPA of 3.3 in all course work and a 3.5 average in all courses applying to their FGSS major. Students interested in the honors program should consult the DUS late in the spring semester of their junior year or very early in the fall semester of their senior year.
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FGSS 4991 : Senior Honors Thesis II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jane Juffer
Durba Ghosh
To graduate with honors, FGSS majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an FGSS faculty member and defend that thesis orally before an honors committee. To be eligible for honors, students must have at least a cumulative GPA of 3.3 in all course work and a 3.5 average in all courses applying to their FGSS major. Students interested in the honors program should consult the DUS late in the spring semester of their junior year or very early in the fall semester of their senior year.
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FGSS 6207 : Black Feminist Theories: Sexuality, Creativity, and Power
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6207, COML 6465, ENGL 6207 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
This course examines black feminist theories as they are articulated in the cross-cultural experiences of women across the African Diaspora. We will explore a variety of theories, texts and creative encounters within their socio-political and geographical frames and locations, analyzing these against, or in relation to, a range of feminist activisms and movements. Some key categories of discussion will include Black Left Feminism, Feminist Movements in Latin America and the Caribbean and African feminisms. Texts like the Combahee River Collective statement and a variety of US Black feminist positions and the related literature as well as earlier black feminist articulations such as the Sojourners for Truth and Justice will also be engaged. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own research projects from a range of possibilities.
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FGSS 6312 : Synthesizing Pop: Electronics and the Musical Imagination
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4312, LGBT 4312, LGBT 6312, MUSIC 4312, MUSIC 6312, STS 4312, STS 6312 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Roger Moseley
Judith Peraino
From Switched-On Bach to Synthpop and EDM, since the late 1960s electronic synthesizers have expanded the sonic palette and identity formation of popular musicians, leading to new concepts of sound and performance as well as communal, technological, and human interfaces. This course will explore the cultural history of analog synthesizers and their progeny of digital devices (samplers, sequencers, drum machines) and desktop technologies that revolutionized popular music soundscapes and embodiment. Synthesis will be considered as both a musical technology and theoretical concept that together spark imagined cyborg identities and post-human futures, challenging and resynthesizing categories of gender, sexuality, and race. Student will also have the opportunity to engage with Cornell's Robert Moog Archive and develop research, creative, or curation projects that may be featured in the spring 2020 exhibition and programming to celebrate this collection.  This course is open to graduate students and fourth-year undergraduates by permission.  Undergraduates should contact the instructor before enrolling.
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FGSS 6331 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4451, ASIAN 6631, FGSS 4451, LGBT 4451, LGBT 6331, PMA 4451, RELST 4451 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Arnika Fuhrmann
Examines the new cinemas of Southeast Asia and their engagement with contemporary discourses of gender and sexuality. It pays special attention to the ways in which sexuality and gendered embodiment are at present linked to citizenship and other forms of belonging and to how the films draw on Buddhist and Islamic traditions of representation and belief. Focusing on globally circulating Southeast Asian films of the past 15 years, the course draws on current writings from feminism, Buddhist studies, affect theory, queer studies, postcolonial theory, and film studies to ask what new understandings of subjectivity might emerge from these cinemas and their political contexts. Films will be drawn from both mainstream and independent cinema and will include the work of directors such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Danny and Oxide Pang, Yau Ching, Thunska Pansittivorakul, Garin Nugroho, and Jean-Jacques Annaud.
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FGSS 6504 : The City: Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4423, ASIAN 6623, FGSS 4504, PMA 4504 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Arnika Fuhrmann
This course uses the lens of temporality to track transformations in notions of urban personhood and collective life engendered by recent trans-Asia economic shifts. We will develop tools that help unpack the spatial and cultural forms of density and the layered histories that define the contemporary urban fabric of cities such as Hanoi, Bangkok, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. The course combines the investigation of the cinemas and literatures of the region with the study of recent writing on cities from Asian studies, film studies, queer theory, urban studies, political theory, religious studies, cultural geography, literary theory, and anthropology.
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FGSS 6513 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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FGSS 6554 : Modernist Fiction and the Erotics of Style
Crosslisted as: ENGL 6554, LGBT 6445 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ellis Hanson
"I am interested in language because it wounds or seduces me," the critic Roland Barthes once wrote. How do we take pleasure in a text, even when it appears to betray us? How do we speak of the erotics of style beyond the mere thematic interpretation of sexual representation? Has such an erotics even been written yet? To explore a methodology for contemplating this elusive embrace between the aesthetic and the erotic, we will consider influential works of psychoanalytic, deconstructive, feminist, and queer theory alongside a survey of great modernist novelists whose innovative experiments in prose style have proved most sensual and most challenging, among them Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Ronald Firbank, and Djuna Barnes.
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FGSS 6601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4601, ARTH 6601, FGSS 4601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lisa Pincus
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
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FGSS 6641 : Racial Ecologies of Transpacific Nuclearism
Crosslisted as: AAS 4640, AMST 4640, COML 4640, FGSS 4641, SHUM 4640, SHUM 6640 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
This course examines the emergence of nuclear energy in Asia and the Pacific after World War Two as a transpacific settler colonial institution and discourse. Building on current environmental humanities scholarship on the nuclear Pacific, this course uses transpacific nuclearism as an anchoring point to explore ways that theories of biopolitics, necropolitics, and comparative racialization can productively inform scholarly approaches to contemporary ecological crises. For longer description and instructor bio visit http://societyhumanities.as.cornell.edu/courses.
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FGSS 6676 : Digital Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3376, ASIAN 6676, FGSS 3376 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Arnika Fuhrmann
New media remain central to ongoing struggles over the constitution of the public sphere in Asia. In high measure, censorship affects the Internet and visual media (including digital, independent cinema), and government agencies are particularly wary of the viral qualities of new media. Extensive state investment into Internet control is offset by the fact that the Internet remains a primary site of political dissent and organizing. New media and communications technologies further continue to engender novel forms of political expression and notions of collectivity. In the past few years activists and artists as well as mass publics have thus forged distinct modes of expression in and around new media that, while frequently evading state prohibition, nevertheless present incisive political critique. The course will examine features unique to digital media—such as the viral, mimetic, archival, and amplificatory properties of the Internet—and ask how politicized media make use of these features to intervene into contexts of censorship and occlusion. We will draw on Asian media contexts also to interrogate assumptions about progressive politics. Investigating the logics of contemporary digital media in relation to the field of political expression, the course complicates received notions of non-Western political public spheres as illiberal, or lagging behind a stage of political development posited as normative.
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FGSS 6845 : Labor, Race, and Gender
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4845, ILRLR 4845, ILRLR 6845 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kate Bronfenbrenner
The majority of existing union members are women and workers of color, and, since the mid-1980s, the majority of newly organized workers have been women of color, particularly black women and recent immigrants from Latin America. Yet, with the exception of just a handful of unions, the labor movement still has been slow to build on this support and enthusiasm. This course will focus on the challenges and possibilities created by the changing demographics of race and gender in the contemporary labor movement. Through a combination of readings, small group discussions, guest speakers, and library and on line research, short essays and one longer research paper; the course will examine these issues from an historical, demographic, labor relations, and sociological perspective.
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FGSS 6880 : Proseminar in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lucinda Ramberg
This course offers an introduction to theoretical and practical aspects of the interdisciplinary field of Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies, providing graduate students with a range of disciplinary approaches and issues. We will explore both the disciplinary specifics of FGSS scholarship and the interdisciplinary breadth of gender/sexuality's reach as an analytic lens. While many of our graduate courses train students in highly specialized areas of feminist theory, this course aims to teach students how to find common intellectual ground from interdisciplinary perspectives without sacrificing the complexity of any disciplinary approach. The course is designed for graduate minors in FGSS and students with a specialized interest in feminist theory. Although it is not required, the course is strongly recommended for students obtaining a graduate minor in FGSS.
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FGSS 6990 : Topics in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course for graduate students on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students develop a course of readings in consultation with a faculty member in the field of Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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FGSS 6990 : Topics in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course for graduate students on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students develop a course of readings in consultation with a faculty member in the field of Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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FGSS 7850 : International Gender Rights Seminar
Crosslisted as: LAW 7850 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sandra Babcock
Description