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FGSS 1940 : A Global History of Love
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1193, HIST 1930, LGBT 1940 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
By posing seemingly simple questions such as what is love and who has the right to love, this introductory-level lecture course surveys how love has been experienced and expressed from the pre-modern period to the present. Through case studies of familial and conjugal love in Africa, Asia, the US, Europe, and South and Latin America, the course will examine the debates about and enactment's of what constitutes the appropriate way to show love and affection in different cultures and historical contexts. Among the themes we will explore are questions of sexuality, marriage, kinship, and gender rights. A final unit will examine these themes through modern technologies such as the Internet, scientific advances in medicine, and a growing awareness that who and how we love is anything but simple or universal.
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FGSS 2010 : Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program focused on understanding the impact of gender and sexuality on the world around us and on the power hierarchies that structure it. This course provides an overview of key concepts, questions, and debates within feminist studies both locally and globally, focusing mainly on the experiences, historical conditions, and concerns of women as they are shaped by gender and sexuality.  We will read a variety of texts--personal narratives, historical documents, and cultural criticism --across a range of disciplines, and will consider how larger structural systems of both privilege and oppression affect individuals' identities, experiences, and options. We will also examine forms of agency and action taken by women in the face of these larger systems.
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FGSS 2010 : Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program focused on understanding the impact of gender and sexuality on the world around us and on the power hierarchies that structure it. This course provides an overview of key concepts, questions, and debates within feminist studies both locally and globally, focusing mainly on the experiences, historical conditions, and concerns of women as they are shaped by gender and sexuality.  We will read a variety of texts--personal narratives, historical documents, and cultural criticism --across a range of disciplines, and will consider how larger structural systems of both privilege and oppression affect individuals' identities, experiences, and options. We will also examine forms of agency and action taken by women in the face of these larger systems.
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FGSS 2267 : Women and Society in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2267, CAPS 2267 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2290 : Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Crosslisted as: COML 2290, LGBT 2290 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Since roughly the middle of the nineteenth century, it has become important for some of us, in some parts of the world, to identify ourselves according to categories such as gender and sexuality, categories further subdivided along some of the lines suggested by the acronym LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender). This course seeks to give students the opportunity to wrestle with what's at stake in this process of identification, as well as the alternatives to identity (and gender and sexuality) that have arisen in earlier and other cultures. From ancient pedagogical eros, through medieval conceptions of nature and its abuses, to early modern mappings of sexual strangeness onto non-European bodies, we'll examine the prehistory of our modern identities, even as we engage with the limits of those identities here and now.
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FGSS 2351 : Intro to Africa and its Diaspora
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2351 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the study of Africa and its Diasporas, including the Americas and West Indies, as well as Europe.  The course takes a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach to a range of historical, literary, artistic, religious, economic, and political questions crucial to the understanding of the experiences of people of African descent.  Using maps, films, the visual arts, music, important historical and contemporary texts, and short stories, the course will focus on four major themes: 1) migration and the middle passage; 2) slavery and resistance; 3) segregation, colonialism and freedom movements; and 4) the arts and global Black consciousness.
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FGSS 2421 : Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2421, LGBT 2421 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the anthropology of sex, sexuality and gender, this course uses case studies from around the world to explore how the worlds of the sexes become gendered.  In ethnographic, ethnohistorical and contemporary globalizing contexts, we will look at: intersexuality & 'supernumerary' genders; physical & cultural reproduction; sexuality; and sex- & gender-based violence & power. We will use lectures, films, discussion sections and short field-based exercises.
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FGSS 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2468, BSOC 2468, STS 2468 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this "medicalization of life" may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.
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FGSS 2501 : Playing out Difference: History and Identity in Sports Film
Crosslisted as: AMST 2505, PMA 2501, VISST 2502 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2511 : Black Women to 1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 2511, ASRC 2511, HIST 2511 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the social, cultural and communal lives of black women in North America, beginning with the transatlantic slave trade, and ending in 1900. Topics include Northern and Southern enslavement, first freedoms in the North, Southern emancipation, color consciousness, gener-cross racially and issues of class.
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FGSS 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2512, ASRC 2512, HIST 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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FGSS 2515 : Women and the Novel: Key Questions in Modern Fiction
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2515 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores some of the key questions raised in modern fiction by studying novels by women from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, Jane Austen's Emma, Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own and Mrs. Dalloway, Toni Morrison's Sula, and Leslie Marmon Silko's Gardens in the Dunes. These novels treat issues of slavery and race, ethnicity and the environment, love and marriage, sexuality and homosexuality, and history and women's history. Students in the class will work together to develop strong close readings of the works and to explore the contexts in which they were written. These discussions will help us assess the distinctive impact of women writers in modern fiction.
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FGSS 2620 : Performing Death and Desire: Vampires on Stage and Screen
Crosslisted as: PMA 2620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2621 : Gendering Religion, Science, and Technology
Crosslisted as: AMST 2621, STS 2621 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
There are several "just-so stories" about science and religion: the world's religions are parallel systems of belief in the supernatural; science has a set method that produces universal truths; and religion and science are in perpetual conflict. This course will challenge these understandings by introducing students to the study of religion, science, and technology, as well as to ways to think about their relationships. To bring these categories down to earth and unsettle engrained scholarly and popular narratives, our approach will be to gender the study of religion, science, and technology. To do so, we will not simply "add women and stir," to borrow a phrase from feminist historians; rather, we will query how gender, sexuality, and embodiment shape the very construction of knowledge itself.
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FGSS 2633 : Sex, Gender, and Identity in Ancient Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2633 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 2841 : Viruses-Humans-Viral Politics (Social History and Cultural Politics of HIV & AIDS)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2021, LGBT 2841, STS 2841 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores what has been termed "the modern plague."  It investigates the social history, cultural politics, biological processes, and global impacts of the retrovirus, HIV, and the disease syndrome, AIDS. It engages material from multiple fields: life sciences, social sciences, & humanities as well as media reports, government documents, activist art, and community-based documentaries. It explores various meanings and life-experiences of HIV & AIDS; examines conflicting understandings of health, disease, the body; investigates political struggles over scientific research, biomedical & public health interventions, and cultural representations; and queries how HIV vulnerability is shaped by systems of power and inequality. As well, we come to learn about the practices, the politics, and the ethics of life and care that arise in "the age of epidemic."
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FGSS 3000 : Feminist Theory
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will work across and between the disciplines to consider what it might mean to think 'as a feminist' about many things including, but not limited to 'gender', 'women' and 'sexuality'. We will approach theory as a tool for analyzing relations of power and a means of transforming ways of thinking and living. In particular, we will investigate the cultural, social, and historical assumptions that shape the possibilities and problematics of gender and sexuality. Throughout we will attend to specific histories of class, race, ethnicity, culture, nation, religion and sexuality, with an eye to their particular incitements to and challenges for feminist thinking and politics.
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FGSS 3210 : Gender and the Brain
Crosslisted as: BIONB 3215, LGBT 3210 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, we will delve into the neuroscience of gender difference. Reading the original scientific papers and related critical texts, we will ask whether we can find measureable physical differences in male and female brains, and what these differences might be. Do men and women solve spatial puzzles differently, as measured physiologically? Do nonhuman animals display sex-specific behaviors mediated by brain structure, and can we extrapolate these findings to human behavior? Why are boys three times more likely than girls to be diagnosed as autistic, and is there any connection between the predominantly male phenomenon of autism and other stereotypically male mental traits? Are there physical representations of sexual orientation in the brain, and how are these related to gender identity? And how are scientific studies represented and misrepresented in popular debate?
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FGSS 3376 : Digital Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3376, ASIAN 6676, FGSS 6676 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
New media remain central to ongoing struggles over the constitution of the public sphere in Asia. In high measure, censorship affects the Internet and visual media (including digital, independent cinema), and government agencies are particularly wary of the viral qualities of new media. Extensive state investment into Internet control is offset by the fact that the Internet remains a primary site of political dissent and organizing. New media and communications technologies further continue to engender novel forms of political expression and notions of collectivity. In the past few years activists and artists as well as mass publics have thus forged distinct modes of expression in and around new media that, while frequently evading state prohibition, nevertheless present incisive political critique. The course will examine features unique to digital media—such as the viral, mimetic, archival, and amplificatory properties of the Internet—and ask how politicized media make use of these features to intervene into contexts of censorship and occlusion. We will draw on Asian media contexts also to interrogate assumptions about progressive politics. Investigating the logics of contemporary digital media in relation to the field of political expression, the course complicates received notions of non-Western political public spheres as illiberal, or lagging behind a stage of political development posited as normative.
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FGSS 3505 : Blaxploitation Film and Photography
Crosslisted as: AMST 3515, ARTH 3505, ASRC 3505, PMA 3505, VISST 3505 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Blaxploitation films of the 1970s are remembered for their gigantic Afros, enormous guns, slammin' soundtracks, sex, drugs, nudity, and violence. Never before or since have so many African American performers been featured in starring roles. Macho male images were projected alongside strong, yet sexually submissive female ones. But how did these images affect the roles that black men and women played on and off the screen and the portrayal of the black body in contemporary society? This interdisciplinary course explores the range of ideas and methods used by critical thinkers in addressing the body in art, film, photography and the media. We will consider how the display of the black body affects how we see and interpret the world by examining the construction of beauty, fashion, hairstyles and gendered images as well as sexuality, violence, race, and hip-hop culture.
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FGSS 3520 : (Dis)ability Studies: A Brief History
Crosslisted as: FREN 3520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will offer an historical overview of responses to bodily and cognitive difference.  What was the status of the monster, the freak, the abnormal, the (dis)abled, and how are all of these concepts related?  How have we moved from isolation and institutionalization towards universal design and accessibility as the dominant concepts relative to (dis)ability?  Why is this shift from focusing on individual difference as a negative attribute to reshaping our architectural and more broadly social constructions important for everyone?  What are our ethical responsibilities towards those we label as "disabled"?  Authors to be studied include: Ambroise Paré, Emmanuel Levinas, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Lennard Davis, Tobin Siebers, Simon Baron-Cohen.
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FGSS 3540 : Modeling Race, Fashioning Beauty
Crosslisted as: AMST 3560, ASRC 3550 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 3550 : Decadence
Crosslisted as: COML 3550, ENGL 3550, LGBT 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
"My existence is a scandal," Oscar Wilde once wrote, summing up in an epigram the effect of his carefully cultivated style of perversity and paradox. Through their celebration of "art for art's sake" and all that was considered artificial, unnatural, or obscene, the Decadent writers of the late-nineteenth century sought to free the pleasures of beauty, spirituality, and sexual desire from their more conventional ethical moorings. We will focus on the literature of the period, including works by Charles Baudelaire, Edgar Allan Poe, A. C. Swinburne, and especially Oscar Wilde, and we will also consider related developments in aesthetic philosophy, painting, music, theater, architecture, and design.
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FGSS 3588 : Creating Renaissance Man (and Woman)
Crosslisted as: ITAL 3580 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is dedicated to studying important works of literature that address what it means, in the Renaissance, to strive for excellence as a man or as a woman, especially in the public sphere and in love.
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FGSS 3655 : Women in New Media Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3651, VISST 3651 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The work of women artists has been central to the development of new media art. These rich and varied practices include installation, virtual reality environments, net art, digital video, networked performance, tactical media, video games, remix and robotics. This course will begin with an overview of feminist art and early experiments in performance and video art to then investigate multiple currents of digital media. Discussions will focus primarily on works by women artists from Europe, the Americas and Australia.
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FGSS 3691 : The Race and Gender of Poverty in Literature and Film
Crosslisted as: AMST 3690, ENGL 3690 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Poverty is an ongoing issue in the United States, and has intensified since the recession of 2008. As such, poverty has disproportionately affected women and underrepresented racial and ethnic communities. This course will analyze this issue through its representation in film and literature, both fiction and non-fiction.
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FGSS 3733 : Culinary Fictions, Literary Cuisines
Crosslisted as: AMST 3733, ENGL 3733 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
When is a cookbook not a cookbook? When it's a memoir, of course! Why would a novelist make a chef the protagonist of a story? What's the pay-off for a poet in choosing a plum as the subject of a poem? This couse will explore these and other literary food-related questions. Through a focus on the ways that writers use the language of food to explore issues such as gender, power, race and nation, we will ask what food can tell us about the dynamic of power and its circulation in US culture. We will read novels, poems, memoirs and even a cookbook or two. Writers under consideration may include Diana Abu-Jaber, Margaret Atwood, MFK Fisher, Ruth Ozeki, Monique Truong, Helena María Viramontes, and William Carlos Williams, among others.
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FGSS 3820 : The Gendered Workplace
Crosslisted as: ILRLR 3820, ILRLR 5820 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will examine the range of issues surrounding the experience of gender in the modern workplace. Topics may include the historical role of women in the workplace; sex segregation in the workplace; norms of masculinity; the intersectionality of issues including race, lgbtq, and disability; gendered legal issues; work-family issues; pay equity; gender discrimination; harassment and bullying; union representation; and many others. Students will be exposed to both research and practical applications of various topics. This class will have a different guest speaker each week. Each speaker will assign readings for their topic, to be read before their class meeting.
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FGSS 3990 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Individual study program intended for juniors and seniors working on special topics with selected reading or research projects not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with a FGSS faculty member who has agreed to supervise the independent study.
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FGSS 3991 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individual study program intended for juniors and seniors working on special topics with selected reading or research projects not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with a FGSS faculty member who has agreed to supervise the independent study.
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FGSS 4000 : Senior Seminar in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
For Spring 2018, this course will focus on The Complexities of Consent.  The issue of consent is central to much feminism scholarship, yet its meaning is contested. It figures prominently in relation to sex as well as to other issues, such as informed consent to medical procedures, children's rights, surrogacy, and (alienated) labor. Consent occurs (or doesn't) within structures of power; can one consent within conditions that are not, so to speak, of one's own making? What about subjects, such as children, who do not use the "rational" language of consent? We draw from legal theory, science studies, and philosophy. How does consent differ from agency? Autonomy? Freedom? We consider case studies that speak to how consent is defined differently across cultures. Under what conditions is consent possible? What alternatives might we envision?
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FGSS 4020 : Reading the Body in Medicine and Fiction
Crosslisted as: SPAN 4020 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how modern Spanish writers and doctors represented the human body as they grappled with disease and disability.  Reading fiction alongside medical and anthropological texts we will examine notions of the normal/abnormal, beautiful/ugly/ and healthy/infected as they change over time.  We also look at the ways in which these concepts are inflected by other identity categories such as gender, race, sexuality, and class.
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FGSS 4035 : Intersectionality in Disability Studies
Crosslisted as: ILRLR 4035 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A recognition of the importance of intersectionality, or the understanding of how identities such as disability, race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, socioeconomic class, and national origin, among others, multiply overlap and connect, is becoming increasingly key to combat discrimination and oppression. This course will examine how intersectional disability experiences, in particular, impact and are impacted by access to employment, education, and health care. We will explore the efficacy of legal and policy initiatives that are already in place, and in doing so, strongly consider the growing need for, and value of, intersectional approaches to disability discrimination.
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FGSS 4114 : Science, Medicine, the Body: A Critical Race and Feminist Inquiry
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4114, ANTHR 7114, FGSS 7114, STS 4741, STS 7741 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will consider the production of the human body as an artifact of race, sex and gender through the discourses, practices, and technologies of bio-science and bio-medicine. We will read critical race, feminist, and postcolonial critiques of science and medicine as forms of knowledge complicit with imperial, racist and patriarchal political projects as well as conduits for humanitarianism and emancipation. We will examine case studies in the histories of science and medicine such as the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, commercial surrogacy, plastic surgery, the global trade in organs, and the HeLa cell line. We will also think together about collaborations between patients and doctors, citizens and scientists, that have produced new ways of inhabiting the body, new forms of human relations, and new kinds of justice.
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FGSS 4160 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4416, HIST 4160, LGBT 4160 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students consider the relationships among colonialism and gender and sexual identity formation in Southeast Asia. Using material from a wide range of fields including anthropology and literature, the course complicates the simplistic East/West and male/female binary. Each year the course is offered, its emphasis shifts to adapt to changes in the fields of gender, sexuality and Asian Studies. It incorporates theoretical literature and content that is broader than that of Southeast Asia. 
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FGSS 4290 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4490, ANTHR 7490, FGSS 6290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 4240, RELST 6290 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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FGSS 4402 : Women in Hip Hop
Crosslisted as: AMST 4402, ANTHR 4102, ASRC 4402, LGBT 4402 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4451 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4451, ASIAN 6631, FGSS 6331, LGBT 4451, LGBT 6331, PMA 4451, RELST 4451 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4460 : Women in the Economy
Crosslisted as: ECON 3440, ILRLE 4450 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Examines the changing economic roles of women and men in the labor market and in the family. Topics include a historical overview of changing gender roles, the determinants of the gender division of labor in the family, trends in female and male labor-force participation, gender differences in occupations and earnings, the consequences of women's employment for the family, and a consideration of women's status in other countries.
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FGSS 4501 : African Women Writers Critique the PostColonial State
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4501, ASRC 6105, ENGL 4501 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4504 : The City: Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4423, ASIAN 6623, FGSS 6504, PMA 4504 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course uses the lens of temporality to track transformations in notions of urban personhood and collective life engendered by recent trans-Asia economic shifts. We will develop tools that help unpack the spatial and cultural forms of density and the layered histories that define the contemporary urban fabric of cities such as Hanoi, Bangkok, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. The course combines the investigation of the cinemas and literatures of the region with the study of recent writing on cities from Asian studies, film studies, queer theory, urban studies, political theory, religious studies, cultural geography, literary theory, and anthropology.
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FGSS 4509 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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FGSS 4607 : Written on the Body
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4446, COML 4704 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Images of tattooed, inscribed, and marked bodies abound in popular media, from television series to blogs, from performance art to popular literature. When the body becomes a canvas or text, this raises crucial questions about the interactions between individual bodies, culture/s, and society/ies. In this course we will pay particular attention to the shifting meanings of body modification in different cultural, theoretical, and historical contexts. Course material will include texts, films, and artwork by Michel de Certeau, Jacques Derrida, Georges Didi-Huberman, Lalla Essaydi, Zhang Huan, Franz Kafka, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Mirta Kupferminc, Christopher Nolan, Renata Salecl, Stelarc, Jun'ichiro Tanizaki, Qiu Zhijie, and others, as well as television series, internet forums, and other popular culture formats.
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FGSS 4620 : Undocumentation
Crosslisted as: AMST 4620, COML 4616, LATA 4620, LSP 4621, ROMS 4625, SHUM 4620, VISST 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will sustain a particular reading of post-1984 Mexico-US border cultural production as "undocumentation." Specifically, we will focus on performance, conceptual, and cinematic practices that corrupt the spreadsheet and the exposé; that reflect their makers' commitments to portraying extreme labor situations in a period of greater Mexican neoliberal transition now synonymous with NAFTA, culture and drug wars, and border militarization and maquilization. Assigned texts will include artwork by the Border Art Workshop and Elizabeth Sisco, Louis Hock, and David Avalos; writing by Gloria Anzaldúa, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Sara Uribe, and Sergio González Rodríguez; contributions to the Tijuana-San Diego installation festival inSITE; and "undocumentaries" like Alex Rivera's Borders Trilogy, Sergio De La Torre and Vicki Funari's Maquilapolis, and Natalia Almada's El Velador.
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FGSS 4652 : Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000)
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4651, NES 4652, NES 6652 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000) will explore the history of medicine and science in the Middle East from early modern period to the present. It covers the main topics and questions regarding bodies, diseases, and medical institutions within the framework of major historical developments in world and region's history. The course investigates how medicine and knowledge about diseases and bodies changed political and social conditions as well as how the latter defined and transformed the ways in which people imagined health, life, and environment. Scholars have often analyzed history of medicine in the Middle Eastern societies either in relation to Islamic culture in the early modern period or in relation to more recent Westernization. This course seeks to challenge these fixed paradigms and shed light onto questions and research agendas that will unearth the encounters, connections and mobility of bacteria, bodies, and medical methods among various communities by locating the history of medical knowledge and practices of the Middle East within global history.  It will highlight that the history of medicine in the colonial world itself is varied and wide ranging, investigating how medical missions intersected with civilizing missions, how colonial discourses were used to explain disease prevalence, and the relationship between the metropole and colony in propagating certain medical theories and practices. The course seeks to facilitate student engagement with various primary and secondary sources and new technologies to teach both historiographical methods and the content of the history of medicine in the Middle East.
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FGSS 4701 : Nightlife
Crosslisted as: AMST 4705, LGBT 4701, LSP 4701, LSP 6701, PMA 4701, PMA 6701 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores nightlife as a temporality that fosters countercultural performances of the self and that serves as a site for the emergence of alternative kinship networks.  Focusing on queer communities of color, course participants will be asked to interrogate the ways in which nightlife demonstrates the queer world-making potential that exists beyond the normative 9-5 capitalist model of production. Performances of the everyday, alongside films, texts, and performance art, will be analyzed through a performance studies methodological lens.  Through close readings and sustained cultural analysis, students will acquire a critical understanding of the potentiality of spaces, places, and geographies codified as "after hours" in the development of subcultures, alternative sexualities, and emerging performance practices.
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FGSS 4711 : Late Theory
Crosslisted as: FGSS 6711, LGBT 4710, LGBT 6710, PMA 4710, PMA 6710 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar explores theoretical work in which lateness figures as the signal condition, gesture, problem, or method. We begin with two topics prominent in twentieth-century criticism: late style and late capitalism. We then pivot to contemporary theory "after" theory—or what Amy Holzapfel calls "subprime critique": works marked variously by senses or intimations of belatedness, loss, exhaustion, and decay. Throughout, theoretical readings are paired with an eclectic set of art objects, ranging from literary fictions (James, Baldwin) to more and less popular television series (The Sopranos, Roseanne's Nuts) to avant-garde performances (The Lily's Revenge, Discotropic). Authors may include Adorno, Agamben, Berlant, Jameson, Mbembe, Moten, Said, and Sedgwick. Issues of ability, age, class, gender, race, and sexuality are foregrounded.
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FGSS 4755 : Sexology and the Novel
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4755, LGBT 4755 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4841 : What is (an) Epidemic? (Infectious Diseases in Historical, Social, and Political Perspective)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4041, BSOC 4841, STS 4841 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The term "epidemic" travels widely and wildly in contemporary worlds.  But, what, when and where is "the epidemic"? How and why does epidemic unfold? This senior seminar offers an interdisciplinary exploration of infectious diseases.  Our investigations take us from medieval Europe's "Black Plague," to Tuberculosis in early twentieth century United States and its global resurgence at the turn of the twenty-first, to Ebola and its ongoing, periodic outbreaks today. We consider the consequences epidemics have for how we live and imagine shared ecological futures.  Examining work from the life sciences, social sciences, and arts & humanities, we explore the ways in which life and death, disease and survivability, health and thriving are shaped by infectious microbes, embodied eco-social forces, and contingent regimes of knowledge-power. 
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FGSS 4841 : What is (an) Epidemic? (Infectious Diseases in Historical, Social, and Political Perspective)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4041, STS 4841 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The term "epidemic" travels widely and wildly in contemporary worlds.  But, what, when and where is "the epidemic"? How and why does epidemic unfold? This senior seminar offers an interdisciplinary exploration of infectious diseases.  Our investigations take us from medieval Europe's "Black Plague," to Tuberculosis in early twentieth century United States and its global resurgence at the turn of the twenty-first, to Ebola and its ongoing, periodic outbreaks today. We consider the consequences epidemics have for how we live and imagine shared ecological futures.  Examining work from the life sciences, social sciences, and arts & humanities, we explore the ways in which life and death, disease and survivability, health and thriving are shaped by infectious microbes, embodied eco-social forces, and contingent regimes of knowledge-power. 
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FGSS 4876 : Humanitarian Affects
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4176, ANTHR 7176, FGSS 6876, GOVT 4745, GOVT 6745 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4945 : Body Politics in African Literature and Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4995, COML 4945, ENGL 4995, LGBT 4945, VISST 4945 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course examines how postcolonial African writers and filmmakers engage with and revise controversial images of bodies and sexuality--genital cursing, same-sex desire, HIV/AIDS, genital surgeries, etc. Our inquiry also surveys African theorists' troubling of problematic tropes and practices such as the conception in 19th-century racist writings of the colonized as embodiment, the pathologization and hypersexualization of colonized bodies, and the precarious and yet empowering nature of the body and sexuality in the postcolonial African experience. As we focus on African artists and theorists, we also read American and European theorists, including but not certainly limited to Giorgio Agamben, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and Joseph Slaughter, detecting the ways in which discourses around bodies in the African context may shape contemporary theories and vice versa.
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FGSS 4947 : Bio-Politics and Poetics of Nakedness
Crosslisted as: COML 4947 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 4990 : Senior Honors Thesis I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, FGSS majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an FGSS faculty member and defend that thesis orally before an honors committee. To be eligible for honors, students must have at least a cumulative GPA of 3.3 in all course work and a 3.5 average in all courses applying to their FGSS major. Students interested in the honors program should consult the DUS late in the spring semester of their junior year or very early in the fall semester of their senior year.
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FGSS 4991 : Senior Honors Thesis II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, FGSS majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an FGSS faculty member and defend that thesis orally before an honors committee. To be eligible for honors, students must have at least a cumulative GPA of 3.3 in all course work and a 3.5 average in all courses applying to their FGSS major. Students interested in the honors program should consult the DUS late in the spring semester of their junior year or very early in the fall semester of their senior year.
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FGSS 6290 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4490, ANTHR 7490, FGSS 4290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 4240, RELST 6290 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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FGSS 6331 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4451, ASIAN 6631, FGSS 4451, LGBT 4451, LGBT 6331, PMA 4451, RELST 4451 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Examines the new cinemas of Southeast Asia and their engagement with contemporary discourses of gender and sexuality. It pays special attention to the ways in which sexuality and gendered embodiment are at present linked to citizenship and other forms of belonging and to how the films draw on Buddhist and Islamic traditions of representation and belief. Focusing on globally circulating Southeast Asian films of the past 15 years, the course draws on current writings from feminism, Buddhist studies, affect theory, queer studies, postcolonial theory, and film studies to ask what new understandings of subjectivity might emerge from these cinemas and their political contexts. Films will be drawn from both mainstream and independent cinema and will include the work of directors such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Danny and Oxide Pang, Yau Ching, Thunska Pansittivorakul, Garin Nugroho, and Jean-Jacques Annaud.
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FGSS 6504 : The City: Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4423, ASIAN 6623, FGSS 4504, PMA 4504 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course uses the lens of temporality to track transformations in notions of urban personhood and collective life engendered by recent trans-Asia economic shifts. We will develop tools that help unpack the spatial and cultural forms of density and the layered histories that define the contemporary urban fabric of cities such as Hanoi, Bangkok, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. The course combines the investigation of the cinemas and literatures of the region with the study of recent writing on cities from Asian studies, film studies, queer theory, urban studies, political theory, religious studies, cultural geography, literary theory, and anthropology.
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FGSS 6513 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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FGSS 6676 : Digital Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3376, ASIAN 6676, FGSS 3376 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
New media remain central to ongoing struggles over the constitution of the public sphere in Asia. In high measure, censorship affects the Internet and visual media (including digital, independent cinema), and government agencies are particularly wary of the viral qualities of new media. Extensive state investment into Internet control is offset by the fact that the Internet remains a primary site of political dissent and organizing. New media and communications technologies further continue to engender novel forms of political expression and notions of collectivity. In the past few years activists and artists as well as mass publics have thus forged distinct modes of expression in and around new media that, while frequently evading state prohibition, nevertheless present incisive political critique. The course will examine features unique to digital media—such as the viral, mimetic, archival, and amplificatory properties of the Internet—and ask how politicized media make use of these features to intervene into contexts of censorship and occlusion. We will draw on Asian media contexts also to interrogate assumptions about progressive politics. Investigating the logics of contemporary digital media in relation to the field of political expression, the course complicates received notions of non-Western political public spheres as illiberal, or lagging behind a stage of political development posited as normative.
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FGSS 6711 : Late Theory
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4711, LGBT 4710, LGBT 6710, PMA 4710, PMA 6710 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar explores theoretical work in which lateness figures as the signal condition, gesture, problem, or method. We begin with two topics prominent in twentieth-century criticism: late style and late capitalism. We then pivot to contemporary theory "after" theory—or what Amy Holzapfel calls "subprime critique": works marked variously by senses or intimations of belatedness, loss, exhaustion, and decay. Throughout, theoretical readings are paired with an eclectic set of art objects, ranging from literary fictions (James, Baldwin) to more and less popular television series (The Sopranos, Roseanne's Nuts) to avant-garde performances (The Lily's Revenge, Discotropic). Authors may include Adorno, Agamben, Berlant, Jameson, Mbembe, Moten, Said, and Sedgwick. Issues of ability, age, class, gender, race, and sexuality are foregrounded.
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FGSS 6876 : Humanitarian Affects
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4176, ANTHR 7176, FGSS 4876, GOVT 4745, GOVT 6745 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FGSS 6990 : Topics in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent reading course for graduate students on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students develop a course of readings in consultation with a faculty member in the field of Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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FGSS 6990 : Topics in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Independent reading course for graduate students on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students develop a course of readings in consultation with a faculty member in the field of Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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FGSS 7114 : Science, Medicine, the Body: A Critical Race and Feminist Inquiry
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4114, ANTHR 7114, FGSS 4114, STS 4741, STS 7741 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will consider the production of the human body as an artifact of race, sex and gender through the discourses, practices, and technologies of bio-science and bio-medicine.  We will read critical race, feminist, and postcolonial critiques of science and medicine as forms of knowledge complicit with imperial, racist and patriarchal political projects as well as conduits for humanitarianism and emancipation.  We will examine case studies in the histories of science and medicine such as the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, commercial surrogacy, plastic surgery, the global trade in organs, and the HeLa cell line.    We will also think together about collaborations between patients and doctors, citizens and scientists, that have produced new ways of inhabiting the body, new forms of human relations, and new kinds of justice.
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FGSS 7312 : Vocality and Embodiment
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 7312, PMA 7312 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The voice occupies a peculiar phenomenological position, on one hand emanating from material bodies and conveying that materiality with register, mannerism, grain, and break; on the other hand existing as disembodied sound waves, and an internalized sonorous Other. This course will explore the many cultural and conceptual approaches to the voice and its role in the production of music, language, desire, subjectivity, embodiment, and the human.  Students will workshop projects developed within the course or already underway as part of a dissertation, article, performance, or recording.
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